Garden

Verbena

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GeneralitŠ°

The verbena genus has dozens of species of plants, spread all over the globe, particularly in North America and Europe; in the nursery we generally find hybrid varieties of Verbena, often derived from North American species. Verbene are perennials, but most of the varieties that we can find in the nursery tend not to bear the rigors of winter at best, and therefore they are very often grown as annuals; in addition to survival, sometimes it is also a question purely linked to aesthetic problems: with the passing of the years, the verbenas they tend to become excessively disordered and to bloom less and less.

However, there are varieties specially selected to survive the frost and to grow very well even after years of cultivation in pots or in garden beds.


Hybrid verbs

The verbenas hybrids (we often find them with their commercial names, typically Temari and Tapien are the most common varieties in Italy) have foliage of minute size, wrinkled and slightly leathery, rough to the touch, which develops along thin fickle, herbaceous stems, which tend to become hanging ground cover. At the apex of the stems, small umbrella or sphere racemes are produced throughout the spring and summer, which carry numerous small flowers of a very lively color, in shades of purple, blue, pink and red. Verbene is rarely found, albeit hybrid, colored orange or yellow; indeed, typically in nurseries, to make up for this "lack" among the colors of verbene, we find lantanas, which also belong to the verbene family, but are a different species, with very similar flowers.

The flowering of verbene is very prolonged, and its development is rapid, thus allowing us to obtain a real flower bed, which can also cover very large flowerbeds; Verbene is often also grown in pots, especially in hanging baskets, in order to better enjoy the hanging effect of thin branches.

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