Garden

Chives, wild garlic - Allium schoenoprasum

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Chives

Perennial bulb native to Europe and the American continent. It looks like a dense clump of tubular leaves, narrow and long, fleshy, with a pungent scent of garlic and onion, generally 30-40 cm high; it is also called wild garlic, because of its aroma. In the spring it produces decorative pink or purple globular flowers. The ground cover development allows the small plant to grow much over the years. Pruning, practiced to consume the leaves with a pungent aroma, ensures that the plant has a low and compact development.

Chives (allium schoenoprasum) are at the same time an aromatic plant and an extremely decorative herbaceous plant to be inserted in flower beds, borders or even in the rock garden. It also lives very well in a container, to be kept on the balcony or even on a window sill. Its strengths are certainly the leaves, thin, of a beautiful bright green, and its flowers, generally of fuchsia-violet color. Both can also be used in the kitchen. The former to flavor an infinite number of dishes, the latter as a decoration for salads or vegetable dishes.


Chives characteristics

Chives, or wild garlic, are characterized by cylindrical and hollow, deep green leaves, which generally grow up to 35 cm in length (but some cases can even reach 60). They form very dense tufts. Broken or handled they emit a perfume similar to that of garlic or onion, but more delicate. The inflorescences, in the shape of a spherical umbrella, have a diameter of about 2.5 cm. The individual flowers that make it up (up to 30) are bell-shaped, light purple in color (but there are also purple or white ones). They give off a good essence of honey and spring from spring to summer, depending on the soil and climate characteristics of the area.

When they dry, they produce a capsule, usually containing two black seeds that germinate easily.

At the arrival of summer it usually enters vegetative rest, drying slightly, and then producing new leaves when temperatures begin to cool down.

The hypogean apparatus consists of a small bulb and a long root. Both of these parts are not edible.

In any case, it is a lively (that is, the aerial part disappears during the winter, if there are frosts) very resistant to low temperatures. In our country it rarely succumbs for this reason since it is not damaged unless it reaches -25 ° C.

Digestive and aperitif qualities are attributed to it. It is also a good source of vitamins A, B, C and mineral salts.

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