Garden

Ivy - Hedera helix

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Generalitа

The hedera genus includes numerous species of climbing shrubs, evergreens, widespread in the temperate zones of the northern hemisphere; H. helix is ​​a very common species in Europe and in northern parts of Asia. It has thin, semi-woody, flexible stems that become woody over the years; over the entire length the stems of ivy develop small roots, which anchor themselves to the support that supports the plant, be it a tree or a wall. The leaves have a long petiole, probes varying in size, depending on the variety, generally shiny and fairly rigid, carried by a long petiole; the colors are varied, from dark green to very light green, with varieties with variegated leaves of yellow or white; they are three-lobed or five-lobed in shape, with lobes of various shapes, even on the same plant. In general, the fertile stems, or those that produce flowers, have poorly lobed leaves, or even oval. In September-October at the apex of the stems it produces spherical inflorescences, consisting of small green flowers, followed by dark berries. The fruits and the ivy leaves they are toxic if ingested, but are used in herbal medicine and also in pharmacology.


Exposure

Ivy plants aren't afraid of the cold weather and can endure even very harsh temperatures; in fact, however, they fear the heat a little and do not like to receive direct sun; it is therefore advisable to plant in a shaded or semi-shaded place, away from light for most of the day. Some varieties, with small or slow-growing leaves, can also be used without problems as houseplants.

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